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Scheherazade in Blue Jeans
freelance alchemist
But 'song, what do you do at BARCC? 
21st-Jul-2009 09:07 am
One Person can Make a Difference
Locals know that I man tables at street fairs (thanks for stopping by, hugging me, buying lavender products!); all of you know that I'm a Survivor Speaker. SF/F congoers know that I do panels about rape, sexual assault, and sexual politics and problems in fandom - in the community education and prevention branch of BARCC, we're encouraged to identify a community to work with, and fandom is one of mine.

And you've heard me say I do workshops, but what are workshops? Here you go: a list of the workshops I facilitate or co-facilitate!

Respecting Boundaries
Length: 45-60 min.
Suggested audience: ages 12-15
The goal of this workshop is to work with younger youth to identify others’ personal boundaries, understand how to respect them, and develop community responsibility that supports personal boundaries. This session includes discussion and activities about the difficulty of respecting boundaries with friends and peers.

Consent
Length: 1-1.5 hours
Suggested Audience: ages 14-18
This workshop gives youth a fuller understanding of obtaining and giving consent for sexual activity within a relationship. Groups will learn and discuss the legal definition of consent for sexual activity for the state of MA; factors that might influence one’s ability to make an informed and healthy decision to engage in sexual activity; healthy sexual relationships; and local resources if they have questions concerning sexual assault. The workshop is highly interactive, discussion-based and adaptable for many ages.

Sexual Assault: Practicing Prevention
Length: 1-1.5 hours
Suggested audience: ages 16+
The goal of this workshop is to increase awareness of how perpetration happens and to create community responsibility for sexual violence prevention. This session is highly interactive and includes discussion and real-life scenarios generated by youth to practice ways to make relationships and communities less accepting of sexual violence. This workshop is most effective when the audience has a basic understanding of sexual assault. We can provide a two-part workshop or other suggestions for materials and activities.

Becoming Active Bystanders
Length: 2-2.5 hours
Suggested audience: ages 18+
This in-depth skill-building workshop focuses on cultivating a sense of responsibility for our communities and environments. Discussion includes current research on why people act or do not act to challenge inappropriate sexual and violent behaviors. Activities include exercises that explore a range of ways to be an active bystander. This workshop is appropriate for audiences with an understanding of the dynamics of sexual violence and some involvement in their communities, for example peer health or peer leadership
groups.

Clothesline Project
The Clothesline Project is a display in which a clothesline is hung with shirts decorated to represent individual survivors’ experiences. Because they are made by the survivor or someone who cares about them, it is a moving way to depict the impact of sexual violence on survivors, their friends, and families. Many schools or organizations find that this is an effective program to introduce students/people to the impact of sexual assault. BARCC has a collection of shirts, clothesline, and clothespins that we can loan to you for your program. To see a sample of shirts go to http://www.barcc.org/active/awareness/clothesline

Survivor Speakers
Length: 1 hour
BARCC’s Survivor Speakers Bureau is a group of survivors and friends/family members of survivors who volunteer to talk about sexual assault and abuse. Speakers have been trained to address audiences from a variety of backgrounds including students (middle school through graduate school), police officers and other first responders, health and mental health practitioners, parents, and athletes. The presentation format usually is 10-15 minutes of the survivor telling their story followed by a longer Q&A session. Survivors are typically accompanied by a BARCC volunteer who can answer questions about BARCC services or other questions not directly related to the survivor’s experience.

First Responders
Length: 1-2.5 hours
Suggested audience: ages 18+
This workshop presents an innovative model for responding to a disclosure of sexual violence. It stresses the importance of a supportive response to reduce secondary trauma and to encourage the victim to seek further care. This approach trains staff to respond to disclosures emphasizing four key areas: Safety, Empowerment, Empathy, and Knowledge (SEEK). It is an essential tool for creating a safe point of entry for anyone choosing to disclose the sexual violence they experienced. This course is also available as an on on-line course. For more information go to http://www.barcc.org/information/resources-online/course/


Those are our standard workshops. There are about 20 volunteers at any given time (emotionally difficult work = high turnover), and several staffers. (We're always looking for more volunteers!) These volunteers cover the entire Boston area, suburbs and all; we go to colleges and high schools, police departments and hospitals. We go pretty much everywhere we're asked.

Think one of these programs could be beneficial for your place of work? Contact us!

And SPONSOR ME! The more funding we get, the more we can do!
Comments 
21st-Jul-2009 02:27 pm (UTC)
You know....I think all of those workshops ought to be MANDATORY and STANDARD for all, male and female alike.

Instead of gym class, how about these? I bet it would be far more useful than knowing how to serve a volleyball...
21st-Jul-2009 03:21 pm (UTC)
These all sound like wonderful workshops! Thank you for all your hard work.
21st-Jul-2009 04:07 pm (UTC)
Thanks for this post. It's very interesting to see all the things that BARCC offers, and that you do as a volunteer.

I wish we had something like BARCC here... it's a wonderful organization!
21st-Jul-2009 10:53 pm (UTC)
I...can you get me a press packet?

Because this sounds like something that may need to be brought to the attention of my contacts at my alma mater.
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